Tuesday, May 5, 2009

The Healer, video, lyrics, censored for "n" word, Badu interview


Video of an Erykah Badu interview about how the words for "The Healer" came to her. The song is from her New Amerykah Pt. 1 (4th World War) CD. You can watch another video for "Honey" at Motown. Below is a Vh1 performance of "The Healer" with the "n" word censored.

The lyrics follow the video, and I've deleted the "s" on the word n*gg* because I don't hear an "s" when I listen to it on my MP3 player, didn't hear an "s" when I heard her do it live, don't hear an "s" in the interview above, and from a poetic standpoint, it makes a stronger statement in the singular. Other than that, I can't vouch for the lyrics because it's a complicated song to sing, and I got the lyrics from one of those "lyrics" sites.

And yes, I disemvoweled the "n" word in the lyrics below to avoid offending some of my readers or misleading some people to believe that it's okay to use this word when you don't know what the hell you're talking about or who you are, can't say you've reclaimed it, or are from the tribe that made negro, n*gg*r, or nigra an insult.

The Healer
lyrics by Erykah Badu

"The Healer (Hip Hop)"

[Chorus:]
Humdi Lila Allah Jehovah
Yahweh Dios Ma'at Jah
Rastafara Fyah, dance, sex, music, hip-hop

It's bigger than religion
hip-hop
it's bigger than my n*gg*
hip-hop
it's bigger than the government
(humdi luli lali lulo)
This one fa' Dilla, hip-hop
(humdi luli la, humdi luli la lilulo, humdi lulila humdi lulilaaa...)

[V1]
we ain't dead said the children. don't believe it.
We just made ourselves invisible.
underwater, stove-top blue flame scientist come out with your scales up
get baptized in the ocean of the hungry
(Humdi luli lalilulo, Humdi lulilalilu)
when n*gg*s turn in to gods,
walls come tumblin...(aaahhh)

[Chorus]
Humdi Lila Allah Jehovah
Yahweh Dios Ma'at Jah
Rastafara Fyah, dance, sex, music, hip-hop

It's bigger than religion
hip-hop
it's bigger than my n*gg*
hip-hop
it's bigger than the government
(humdi luli lali lulo)
This one is the healer, hip-hop

(humdi luli la, humdi lulilalilulo, humdi lulila, humdi lulilaaaa)

[V2]
Told you we ain't dead yet.
we been livin' through your internet.
you don't have to believe everything you think.
we've been programmed. wake up. we miss you.
they call you indigo, we call you Africa.
go get baptized in the ocean of the people
(Humdi luli lalulilo)
say reboot, refresh, restart.
fresh page, new day, o.g.'s, new key...

(humdi lulila, humdi lulila lilulo, humdi luli la, humdilulila)
The lyrics are complex and profound, but one thing I like about Badu is that while she is provocative and profound, she also has great sense of humor, which you can taste in her live performances and hear on her in her music, especially when you buy the whole CD and not pieces of it.

One example of what I mean is something she said during a concert during VH1's Storytellers:
Getting comfortable after removing her heels, she moves the conversation to Eric Benet (the “sex addict” who opened for her a couple of times, which led to rumors of course), and warns the audience to pay the tabloids no attention.

“Don’t listen to the tabloids, they’re not always true, but what they say about me and the men? Yeah, that’s true," she admits referring to her relationships with Common and baby's father Andre 3000, in a moment of raw humor. "I got ’em wearing crochet pants, but they still soldiers.” With thunderous laughter from the crowd, Badu introduces her next single off the album “Soldier 7.” (Read full article.)
Here's the link to her official website.

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