Saturday, March 6, 2010

Did Tyler Perry bribe the NAACP to Honor Precious? Ishmael Reed Thinks So

With all the talk of the movie Precious having ruled the NAACP Image Awards and speculation about how cast members Gabourey Sidibe and Mo'nique as well as director Lee Daniels may fare at tomorrow night's Academy Awards, one would think there would be more interviews with Sapphire. She wrote Push, the book on which the movie is based.

The African-American Books Examiner, however, has found only two relatively recent interviews with the poet and novelist. One is posted at St. Louis Today and ends with a bang, Sapphire's choice words for fellow poet Ishmael Reed who is not too fond of Precious, the movie, and the other from ... Please continue reading at the African-American Books Examiner.

3 comments:

Anna Renee said...

Wow! I won't be going to see Precious, because I don't need another dose of this black pathos that we see everywhere in the media. But I'm not mad at the movie
Precious, nor that Gaborey and Monique and Lee are winning awards.
I can see Ishmael's point about promoting these stereotypes, but it seems that this is the only kind of black art that can reach those "heights of Oscardom". I do think that Ismael's all out attack against Sapphire is counterproductive. He's just promoting her work all the more! All the good black films get no airplay, we all know that, but now that we black folks have this power of the blogosphere, why not we use it to promote our good black films? We certainly have used it to bash those who speak against us (John Mayer) so lets do what we complain that the white media refuses to do!! Peace!
black-folks.blogspot.com

Lovebabz said...

Clearly Black folks have a long way to go to get some peace around WHO WE ARE. I am so annoyed by folks who thinks this film dishonors Black people. There is truth in all things. There are children being abused...of all racial backgrounds and ethnicities.

We spend way too much time concerning ourselves with what White Folks think. I am tired of the ridiculous comediaes that come out with "US" in them and no one is offended at that mess.

I am not going to see "Precious" either, but not because I have issues with so-called Black Pathos. I am not going because the subject matter is close to the bone for me...my father raped me and sold me for sex. I do not have the strength to see it. But I can support it by encouraging others of courage to see it and talk about it. We must talk about this harbored secret within families and communities. Otherwise the story of "Precious" will have sequels...

Anna Renee said...

@Lovebabz--point taken! We do have a long way to go, and I hope my blog is helping in a small way.
@WSATA Great post, full of info and both sides of the issue well represented. After reading Lovebabz comment, I'm reminded about why I rail against black folks worrying about what white folks think. We need to define ourselves for ourselves and work on ALL our issues! Precious is important for that reason.